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Messages - RyanY

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1
Gen 2 Montero / Re: Electric Door Lock Issues
« on: August 13, 2019, 01:54:57 PM »
The actuator in the driver's door is the master and usually the first to wear out since it's used the most. As noted above, the rubber stops inside the actuator come apart over time and cause your problem. Someone recently posted on the FB Montero page that they had found an aftermarket replacement for $20, which is probably worth doing since it's an easy component to replace.
 

2
Gen 2 Montero / Re: Baseline Service Recommendations?
« on: June 14, 2019, 05:31:16 PM »
While you've got it apart to do the valve stem seals it makes sense to replace the valve lifters with the updated units that have the larger 3mm oil hole. Lifter tick is common to lots of Mitsu engines and if you don't have it yet you likely will in the future.

Also, it's recommended to use OEM parts (Aisin) for the timing belt tensioner and water pump, as aftermarket parts have remarkably high rates of premature failure.

3
Gen 2 Montero / Re: Tach mostly dead
« on: February 07, 2019, 04:48:23 PM »
I've got a similar issue with my 95, although mine is still working around 70% of the time. Anxious to see what you discover.

4
Gen 2 Montero / Re: 1995 SR couple of questions
« on: January 24, 2019, 05:04:55 PM »
It's most likely your windshield side molding - the vertical black plastic/rubber piece that runs up the side of the windshield. They are still available new from Mitsubishi - I just replaced all my moldings when I had a new windshield installed. It's attached by plastic clips underneath which are likely brittle and cracked, and will probably break further if you try to remove it.

6
Mitsubishi Related / Vibrating side mirror repair
« on: July 18, 2018, 12:48:02 PM »
It's a common problem on Monteros for the side mirror glass to shake and vibrate badly enough to make the mirrors useless on some surfaces. I've found a pretty quick and easy fix that seems to work better than many others: a hot glue gun. I did this repair last night with the mirror still on the vehicle in about 10 minutes, which included taking photos and waiting for the hot glue gun to heat up.

Start by removing the attaching screw through the access hole in the bottom of the mirror housing.



The mirror glass should come free at this point - it's supported by two plastic tabs at the top, which is where it usually breaks at. I had replaced my mirror with a used one last year because the base somehow got broken in a parking lot. It turns out that a previous owner of the mirror had already repaired it once using superglue and clear silicone, neither of which proved to be a permanent fix for it.



After scraping the crap off of it and cleaning the surfaces with rubbing alcohol, I liberally applied hot glue to both surfaces at both connection points. Sorry for the poor quality phone pic.



After reassembling the mirror to the housing I replaced the screw on the bottom only to find that it had been stripped out and wouldn't tighten up, so I applied a shot of hot glue to the screw and tightened it as much as possible. If it turns out that the screw won't hold I'll have to take the mirror glass back out and repair the area that the screw goes into with some epoxy. 

7
Mitsubishi Related / Re: Off-road Overheating Issues
« on: July 16, 2018, 10:33:36 AM »
Shovel nailed it, as usual. The only point that I would add to his wonderfully thorough post is to be sure that your fan shroud is intact and correctly installed, both the main shroud and the small access cover on the bottom. A shroud that's broken or is missing the lower portion is compromising the efficiency of the cooling fan, which is what you're relying on for airflow through the radiator at slower vehicle speeds.

It's also good to note that the OEM metal radiator is far better quality and has more cooling capacity than the majority of the aftermarket radiators available. It's worth maintaining and repairing it instead of replacing it with some plastic/aluminum unit that won't cool as well and has a 5-7 year life expectancy.

8
Gen 2 Montero / Re: What to do about an alignment that won't hold?
« on: July 16, 2018, 10:17:41 AM »
The small washers are there to adjust the end play of the axle - there is a spec for the end play in the FSM, and you'll need to adjust the thickness of the washers to get that spec correct.

9
Interesting that that would change. Here's the page from my 95 FSM that I've followed for years.


10
Mitsubishi Related / Re: Custom Hood Scoop Mod!
« on: June 21, 2018, 10:42:05 AM »
Flipping it towards the windshield would be even more likely to introduce more pressure under the hood, since the base of the windshield is a high-pressure area (the basic idea behind cowl-induction hoods).

11
You may want to check my accuracy, but my FSM says lug nut torque should be 72-87 ft.lbs. or 98-118 Nm, considerably lower than the 101 ft.lbs. you've got in the video.

12
Great write-up!

13
Gen 2 Montero / Re: Replaced the headlamp bulbs today and saw this...
« on: June 14, 2018, 12:34:04 PM »
I read somewhere that the funky bracket on the back side of the radiator support that points towards the battery was for some component of a security system - maybe that unused plug is part of that system as well?

14
Adam has noted this previously in another thread - the upper control arm shaft end nuts are lock nuts designed to booger up the threads when they are originally installed in order not to loosen up, and are probably best considered to be one-time use. Either get some new OEM ones, some Nylocks (14mmx1.5), or use lots of Loctite to keep them on if you reuse them.

15
Gen 2 Montero / Re: Why is my ABS MIL on? (Most common causes?)
« on: June 12, 2018, 03:32:30 PM »
You can pull ABS system codes without the MUT2 to find out what is causing it's confusion. On my 95 you jump a connector near the ABS pump and read the flashing codes on the ABS light - your system is probably different being newer and all, consult your friendly neighborhood FSM for procedures specific to your year. :)

Rear brake noise when backing up is probably in the parking drum brake system - a spring out of place or something silly like that. I'd try adjusting the parking brake shoes first and see if anything changes.

Brake squeal can be such a pain to diagnose sometimes - most often it's glazed pads or rotors, but I've seen sticking calipers and slider pins cause it also. It goes without saying that you need to have all the fun little pad locating clips in place and the anti-squeal shims on the backs of the pads (integral with most pads anymore but some cheap brands don't have them).   

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