Author Topic: Steering Wheel Vibration  (Read 2836 times)

BayMonty

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Steering Wheel Vibration
« on: August 02, 2017, 09:08:09 AM »
Just picked up a 2000 Monty a few days ago. It's on 33's. This is my first rig. I was wondering if anyone has had steering wheel vibration only when turning the steering wheel? It doesn't have to be full lock, but even just changing lanes and turning the wheel ever so slightly. When the steering wheel is straight, it's totally smooth. Thoughts?

MrGalantguy

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2017, 09:17:47 AM »
I would inspect front suspension components like the ball joints and inspect control arm bushings. Since you are on 33's...you may have a worn our idler arm. ADD makes a replacement kingpin kit for those running bigger tires like 33's. Stock idler arms are great..but designed to handle the stress of bigger tires and aftermarket one are not even a option.

If you still have a OEM idler arm, you can upgrade it with ADD's kingpin kit.
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BayMonty

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2017, 09:39:18 AM »
I would inspect front suspension components like the ball joints and inspect control arm bushings. Since you are on 33's...you may have a worn our idler arm. ADD makes a replacement kingpin kit for those running bigger tires like 33's. Stock idler arms are great..but designed to handle the stress of bigger tires and aftermarket one are not even a option.

If you still have a OEM idler arm, you can upgrade it with ADD's kingpin kit.

Thanks MrGalantguy! I just looked at the ADD Kingpin product page and see that they mention Moog having an aftermarket idler arm. Do you know if this kingpin upgrade fits in the Moog?

jaccox

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2017, 03:01:40 PM »
I believe Toasty found that the MOOG was indeed rebuildable. Maybe he'll chime in later to verify, but I'd urge finding someone tossing out their OEM and purchase that for a few bucks
1999 Montero. 33x10.5x15 General X3's. 4.90's w/rear locker. Full armor. ADD idler arm. ADD 1.5" complete lift. Siberiean Bushings everywhere. 150W alternator with upgraded 4 AWG leads and grounds. 2nd Battery in the rear for camping stuffs to come.

BayMonty

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2017, 03:42:01 PM »
I believe Toasty found that the MOOG was indeed rebuildable. Maybe he'll chime in later to verify, but I'd urge finding someone tossing out their OEM and purchase that for a few bucks

Thanks jaccox. I may just keep the OEM and buy the ADD kingpin upgrade. I do want to upgrade the tie rods and ball joints however. Any recommendations?

Crumb

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2017, 04:46:33 PM »
Moog=not rebuildable or upgradeable.
 
 As for the vibration, have someone else who has mud terrains drive the truck. Could just be tires, could be steering slop hiding the vibration while going straight.

IncorpoRatedX

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2017, 07:35:22 PM »
There's so much that can contribute to your situation.

Lets start with some questions;
Is there minimal play in the steering wheel when the vehicle is off? In reality when the vehicle is off the steering wheel should barely rotate left-right, anything over 1/4" play means you've got something wearing out or worn out.

Grab a pry bar and crawl under that thing. You'll want to use perpendicular force against every suspension and steering joint or bushing, there's youtube videos on how to inspect your suspension. 33" mud terrains could have chewed up the plastic idler arm bushings and resulted in the mud terrains rotating into a sync that is causing lateral movement of the idler arm shaft.

The solution if you absolutely dont have the time or skill to figure it out is to take it into an alignment shop that offers free inspections, then you can choose to have them fix it or you can leave and make the changes they've suggested.

BayMonty

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2017, 10:29:55 PM »
There's so much that can contribute to your situation.

Lets start with some questions;
Is there minimal play in the steering wheel when the vehicle is off? In reality when the vehicle is off the steering wheel should barely rotate left-right, anything over 1/4" play means you've got something wearing out or worn out.

Grab a pry bar and crawl under that thing. You'll want to use perpendicular force against every suspension and steering joint or bushing, there's youtube videos on how to inspect your suspension. 33" mud terrains could have chewed up the plastic idler arm bushings and resulted in the mud terrains rotating into a sync that is causing lateral movement of the idler arm shaft.

The solution if you absolutely dont have the time or skill to figure it out is to take it into an alignment shop that offers free inspections, then you can choose to have them fix it or you can leave and make the changes they've suggested.
Moog=not rebuildable or upgradeable.
 
 As for the vibration, have someone else who has mud terrains drive the truck. Could just be tires, could be steering slop hiding the vibration while going straight.

I checked the idler arm and it looks like the bushings have worn away. Regardless, I think I'll be upgrading/replacing some of the steering components. Any recommendations for Idler, Pitman, Tie Rods, Ball Joint manufacturer's? If the ADD Kingpin upgrade is awesome, I'll probably go with that...

Thanks everyone!

jaccox

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2017, 06:00:03 AM »
1. If you do have the OEM housing still buy the ADD kingpin now while it's available
2. DO NOT BUY MOOG!!!! (ask me how I know)
3. OEM for all your steering is an upgrade from your worn out steering stuff
1999 Montero. 33x10.5x15 General X3's. 4.90's w/rear locker. Full armor. ADD idler arm. ADD 1.5" complete lift. Siberiean Bushings everywhere. 150W alternator with upgraded 4 AWG leads and grounds. 2nd Battery in the rear for camping stuffs to come.

IncorpoRatedX

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2017, 08:48:38 AM »
ADD will be listing an OEM front end rebuild kit for ball joints and TRE's in coming days.

Most of the aftermarket companies make weaker stuff than the original equipment.

You can bet the ADD idler kingpin is awesome. No Montero in the world steers like one that's been equipped with the ADD kingpin kit.

RyanY

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2017, 03:19:34 PM »
What he said^^^.

Your 33" tires are going to put more force and stress on every part of your steering and suspension systems, and parts are going to wear out quicker than they would with the stock size tires. I'm running 35" tires on mine and made the mistake of buying cheaper aftermarket suspension parts for it, which I later regretted when they didn't last nearly as long as the OEM factory parts. Do yourself a favor and spend the extra money for Mitsu parts, you'll be thankful in the long run.   

Kaioken

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2017, 07:25:42 PM »
I will apologize in advance if I don't make any sense since I am typing this while drunk.

When I first got my '99 Monty, I had an enormous amount of steering wheel play and vibrations.  Vibrations came from bad tires and shocks.  Bad tires due to alignment and bad shocks.  To knock out the steering wheel play, I immediately replaced lower ball joints, Pitman Arm and Idler assembly with an alignment.  Most of play is gone and have 33 inch tires.  I still need to replaced inner and outer tie rods with upper and lower control arm bushings. 

You can always check on youtube on how to inspect parts.  For vibrations, it is usually tire wear and balance.  Steering play, well that would be control arm bushings, inner and outer tie rods, upper and lower ball joints, pitman arm, and idler assembly. 
I'm stuck in Florida...for now
1999 Mitsubishi Montero
2011 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS
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RyanY

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2017, 05:30:17 PM »
There is also an adjustment screw on the steering box that can help reduce the amount of slop in the steering.

JohnnyBfromPeoria

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Re: Steering Wheel Vibration
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2017, 08:46:02 AM »
There is also an adjustment screw on the steering box that can help reduce the amount of slop in the steering.

Be really careful with this. A quarter turn of that adjustment screw means a lot. You need to mark it's present position before loosening the locknut and hold while you do loosen the nut. Tighten it no more than a quarter turn and tighten the locknut and test drive it. If you've overtightened it, you'll know pretty directly, as it makes slightly off-center movements of the steering wheel result in big steering movements. There's a delicate balance between a little free play in the steering box and absolutely none, which isn't as ideal as you might think.

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