Author Topic: Pressure line rebuilding (Fuel injection hose)  (Read 118 times)

Drew84

  • Member
  • Posts: 37
  • Karma: +8/-0
    • View Profile
    • Auto Off Topic Podcast
Pressure line rebuilding (Fuel injection hose)
« on: March 28, 2019, 07:36:31 AM »
This technique should work for most of the OEM crimp on style hoses and a bunch of different Mitsubishis. Probably other makes and models too. Removal and installation will vary on application. As always, take your time, be careful, and don't make more work for yourself.

On my 1999 Montero the high pressure line to the fuel injector rail decided to start spraying out of a pinhole. Not great, especially above the hot exhaust. This was a burn the truck to the ground type failure. It's that tiny stream that looks like a spider's web. I discovered it a few miles from my house and patched it with some Gorilla tape to get me home. Not ideal, but it worked. I tried and failed to get the correct line from Japan as it's NLA in the US. Then it was time to find another way. A fellow Mitsubishi Starion enthusiast recommended this technique to me. 

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

You'll need:
Good quality 5/16 fuel injection hose for this particular job or whatever size fits your needs.
Good clamps
A cut off wheel tool
A Bench vice will help. 
Various hand tools.
PATIENCE

You need to get from this

 Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

to this

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

That means you need to be surgical with the cut off wheel, don't just zip right through the hose. The crimp part is also built into the metal part of the line FYI.

I started by carefully zipping around the crimps with the cut off wheel. When I hit the rubber hose underneath and all the meal was gone, I stopped. Do this for both ends, or however many you need.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Then I used some vice grips to pull the metal back and off, one end was easy, one end I had to split the two "rings". Just work at it.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

It might look like this and you might have to carefully razor some extra hose off. Don't cut your fingers. Use sandpaper or a fine wire wheel to clean these up nice.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

They should be nice and free of old rubber that might cause the line to not seal.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

I eyeballed the length as best I could and cut the hose with a hose cutter.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Used a little bit of white grease to help these slide on, the white grease will dissolve in the gas. Don't forget to put the hose clamp on first. Use good solid fuel hose ones. Earl's sells clamps that match their hose. Don't use worm clamps on these. They can cut into the hose or slip and not get totally tight.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Here's the finished hose.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Close up of the ends
Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr

I had left over clear protector from when I restored my Galant. Not needed, but I was feeling fancy. I might have over don't the length a little bit, but better than being too short.

No leaks and I'm back to driving it.

Untitled by Andrew Pascarella, on Flickr



« Last Edit: March 28, 2019, 08:09:03 AM by Drew84 »
Keep your cars analog.
1990 Talon TSi
1991 Galant VR4
1999 Montero "Cold weather"

Shovel

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 615
  • Karma: +48/-0
  • POTATO
    • View Profile
    • Stuff page updated regularly!
Re: Pressure line rebuilding (Fuel injection hose)
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2019, 08:09:39 AM »
Good info!